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How To Tell Your Spouse You Want A Divorce

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Coming to terms with the fact that your marriage is over is never easy. Telling your spouse you want a divorce is part of the process. Knowing when to have these discussions and having a sound strategy in regards to what you will say can make the situation less difficult.

Picking The Best Time To Tell Your Spouse

Each divorce is different and how you approach telling your spouse will depend on the circumstances involved. These are some general guidelines that can be helpful to follow. Before deciding on what to say, determine the best time to have this conversation:

  • Avoid announcing you want a divorce during the heat of an argument or while nursing a grudge;
  • Make sure you have had time to consider all the ramifications;
  • Make a list of all marital property and assets you possess and copies of important documents;
  • Set up your own bank account and begin making deposits.

The Florida Statutes dictate how important matters such as marital property division, spousal support, and child time sharing are resolved with divorcing couples. To find out how these laws are likely to impact you, request a confidential consultation with our Fort Lauderdale attorney prior to announcing your intent to get a divorce.

Announcing Your Decision To Seek A Divorce

When telling your spouse you want a divorce, Psychology Today advises being as diplomatic as possible. This can help the conversation go more smoothly while setting the tone for divorce proceedings. Ways to accomplish this include:

  • Have this conversation when there are no other pressing demands. After both of you are off work, have had dinner, and put younger children to bed is often the best time. If weekdays are too hectic, late afternoon on a weekend may work as well.

  • Let go of your anger. While it is natural to feel resentment about the situation, try to keep your emotions in check and avoid yelling or otherwise speaking in angry tones.

  • Avoid making accusations or defending your actions. State your case simply, without making your spouse ‘the bad guy’ or being overly defensive about your choice or your role in the marriage.

  • Affirm the good feelings you once had for each other. Try to draw from mutual shared interests, life experiences, and the love and respect you once had for each other.

  • Be firm regarding your intentions. Whether you have made up your mind about getting a divorce or are open to marital counseling and a trial separation, be firm in your intentions and avoid letting your spouse manipulate you with guilt or other emotions.

Discuss Your Options With Our Fort Lauderdale Divorce Attorney Today

Making the decision to get a divorce and informing your spouse is never easy. The exact way this should be handled varies based on the circumstances involved. To discuss your options and how to protect yourself and your rights, reach out to Fort Lauderdale divorce attorney Vanessa L. Prieto. Contact our office to request a confidential consultation today.

Sources:

leg.state.fl.us/statutes/index.cfm?App_mode=Display_Statute&URL=0000-0099/0061/0061.html

psychologytoday.com/us/blog/divorce-grownups/200911/telling-your-spouse-you-want-divorce

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